Gruett’s

farmer. City dwellers in need of weed trimmers, leaf blowers, chain saws and lawn sweepers—perfect for thatching or gravel cleanup—will find them in stock at Gruett’s in New Holstein. There are also several all-terrain vehicles parked in the showroom, representative of Gruett’s full line of powersports equipment used for work or play.

Dave said the amount of equipment on display inside and out in New Holstein is sure to grow, although he said he expects hay and forage equipment sales to be the primary focus in New Holstein. A Customer Appreciation Day open house was held Thursday, March 22 as a way to both say thanks to its customers and to allow area residents to get a look at the new location.

Dave pointed out that anything available at the Potter location can be brought to New Holstein for a customer, and that customers are encouraged to ask if they do not see something in which they might be interested. Gruett’s also sells equipment via its eBay store.

Local names among lines

Among the many lines of equipment carried by Gruett’s are several local names. New Holstein’s own Metko supplies belt feeders and belt or chain conveyors to Gruett’s; Miller Pro rotary rakes and forage blowers from St. Nazianz

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are sold there; and Gruett’s also carries Chilton Trailers.

Gruett’s also manufactures some of its own equipment at its Potter location, although Dave said agricultural sales continues to be the biggest part of Gruett’s.

Harlan helped guide Gruett’s well along that path before he passed away in the early 1990s, and his family has continued to operate and grow the company. Wife Audrey continues to help out with the business, and their sons Dave, Steve, Jeff and Tom and daughter Chris Lau are all involved in the business as well—as is Chris’ husband, Doug.

Although on a much smaller scale, Gruett’s growth over the years mirrors that of New Holland. The famous Henry Ford was a founder of the company more than 110 years ago, and today New Holland is a leading provider of equipment for both farming and manufacturing in every corner of the world. Its agricultural division continues to be headquartered in Racine.

New Holland is working on a new hydrogen-powered tractor which could be out in two or three years and would revolutionize the heavy equipment industry.

A tractor like that is another thing Harlan could not have envisioned back in 1958.